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ethinic home interior

Does your home reflect your culture? Does it tell the story of who you are? Image Source: Kuda Photography

When work is done and errands are complete, there’s one destination that people seek— home sweet home. No matter what your residence whether it’s an apartment, house or mansion—home is a place of refuge.

For this reason, it’s imperative that the space you inhabit exist as a reflection of your personality, taste and style. Above all else, the interior décor you choose for your home should be a testament to those that live underneath its roof. What does this mean? It means that your home interior should reflect who you are and where you came from.

One of the best ways to do this is to use culture as an inspiration for interior design. Culture is an integral part of your family, and when it’s incorporated into your home’s interior design, can be infused into everything you do on a daily basis.

Here are a few more reasons culture should have a spot of honor in your home’s interior:

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modern home budda picture

If you are buddhist then your home can reflect your serene culture/religion through artwork. Image Source: Elemental Design LLC

 The Cultural Domino Effect

Decorating with culture in mind is a way to express those beliefs and lifestyle factors that make you who you are. The statement that culture makes in your home has the ability to create a domino effect that can be extremely positive.

For example, if you fill your kitchen with culturally specific foods and utensils, family and friends alike might be inspired to give something new a try. Or, if you were born in Japan, then maybe it’s time to bring some of those calming Japanese interior designs into your home; thereby, showing all your friends the delicate influence of balance and minimalism in Japanese culture.

Also, adding decorative pieces such as rugs, tapestries or wall accents that are directly linked to your cultural background can be amazing conversation starters, or even a reason to host a get together to show off new pieces that you acquired!

No matter what direction the interior design takes you, when it involves culture, it has a way of drawing others in and opening their eyes to something that already means the world to you. The visitors to your home may in turn decide to decorate their own homes to reflect their own cultures. What could be better than a world of originality where everyone shares their distinct cultural backgrounds with one another?

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moroccan home

This Moroccan-style home certainly reflects the owners culture and roots. Image Source: Laura U

A Real Link To Religion

Religion is often linked to culture and sometimes it can seem difficult to find a way to express your deepest beliefs in your home while maintaining décor schemes.

If you allow culture to weave into design through color palettes, photography or symbols with accent pieces, you’ll soon find that those aspects of your beliefs that you hold close are visible throughout your home’s interior as well.

This may be as simple and obvious as hanging a collection of crosses on your living room wall, or it can be a bit more understated by incorporating the bright blues of the Meditearrean Sea into your decor. Religion comes in all shapes and sizes and doesn’t necessarily refer to an organized faith. Some may feel a deep-rooted love to the ocean where they grew up—surely that constitutes a form of faith through their culture.

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grey living room seashell

Were you born near the ocean; thereby, creating a cultural love of the sea? If so, then infuse your home with reminders such as sea shells. Image Source: OUT to SEE

Coupling Cultures Through Interior Design

It’s very possible that you and your spouse share an amazing love for each other, but come from very different cultural backgrounds and beliefs.

In circumstances like this, highlighting culture in your home’s interior can be a great way to represent both of you as individuals while living under the same roof.

Finding a way to bring attention to both cultures can fuse personalities, styles and beliefs in a very balanced fashion. It can also be an effective way to show family and guests elements of the other’s culture that drew you to one another in the first place.

In this way, culture design becomes a story line to your family’s history and lineage.

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modern yellow room

Meshing two cultures into one house can be difficult, but try to incorporate symbols of both. Image Source: SK-Interiors

Showing Your Cultural Roots

Bringing culture into your home’s interior is a personal step that should reflect your deepest cultural roots.

While culture is sometimes based in practice, for many culture has a lot to do with traveling, crossing borders and visits you’ve made to places that represent your roots. These are trips that you cherish—they are important and should have a place in your interior décor. How can you do this?

Try  to find unique ways to frame photos of culturally significant trips—Consider a canvas collage of people and places that are important and matching their color tone to your overall design scheme. Or bring home seashells or sand in a jar to place on your mantel, always reminding you of the sea-side region to which you were born.

No matter what culture means to you—whether it’s a set of beliefs, places you visit or customs you hold close—it’s possible and beneficial to incorporate into your home’s interior.

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Bringing culture into your home’s interior is a personal step that should reflect your deepest cultural roots. Image Source: Leighton Design

Give culture a chance to shine through your design themes and watch as family and friends alike are able to connect on some level with what’s important to you through the atmosphere you create in your home. Taking time to emphasize what’s most important to you through interior design gives your residence a personal touch that puts your passions on display and speaks to your unique life.

Create a cultural haven in your home and you’ll find you’ve crafted a refuge that’s made-to-fit at the end of each and every day.

How do you reflect your culture into your home?