A Residence with an Ingenious Architecture: Airhole House in Japan
Architecture

A Residence with an Ingenious Architecture: Airhole House in Japan

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Airhole House was designed by Masahiro Kinoshita from KINO architects, a Tokyo based architecture company. The unusual looking two-storey home is located in a residential area in Shiga, Japan and features large volumetric gaps in its structure which allow a good natural ventilation. Here is more information from the architects: the main form of the house was dictated by the shape of the site. On the street level, a covered parking spot is generated by carving out an airhole that opens up east to west. The main entrance is also provided through this space. More predominantly noticeable from the main street to the south is the asymmetrical roof line and terrace space on the second level. funneled in form, the open volume accommodates the outdoor veranda and the living/dining/kitchen area. the west wall offers storage while the pie-shaped space to the east houses the staircase, bathroom and washitsu (or Japanese-style room). (Photographer: Daici Ano)

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3 comments

  • Sonja February 8, 2011 at 19:20 PM Login to Reply →

    A bit austere for my taste — unless it was just staged this way for the photo shoot. Still, very interesting idea.

  • Carpet Wholesaler February 8, 2011 at 19:56 PM Login to Reply →

    What an amazing space! It looks so open and airy. I assume the air holes have an effect on keeping it cool in summer. What happens in winter?

  • Urban February 9, 2011 at 17:11 PM Login to Reply →

    Winter isn’t much of a problem, or at least different from other houses: This isn’t a part of Japan with really cold winters and single glass windows is pretty normal even for modern houses in Japan. And even where they have practically free hot spring water, they don’t heat their houses with them, just the baths.