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Keeping a home comfortable in all seasons and weather conditions is the goal of every homeowner. This often means installing efficient HVAC systems, like furnaces and air conditioners. But old or porous windows can render even the most high-quality HVAC system ineffective and cost you money. So before you open your wallet to replace your furnace or air conditioner, consider upgrading your windows.

That’s where Pella replacement windows come in. The company, which is headquartered in Pella, Iowa, has been selling window products since 1925. Pella has become a leader in the industry, installing millions of replacement windows. They feature several series of windows that use wood, fiberglass, and vinyl to meet a variety of household needs.

Here’s a break-down of the different replacement windows Pella has to offer:

Pella Replacement Windows Series

  • The Architect Series® (wood)

The architect series is a line of windows built to the specifications of standard architecture. These windows can vary, but they typically comply with industry norms allowing for easy replacement in homes built under these standards. These windows can comply with the spectrum of home designs, from classical homes to modern, as long as the home was built using industry standards.

  • Pella Lifestyle Series (wood)

Pella’s Lifestyle series is a wood window product and is one of the highest-ranked offerings due to energy efficiency, value, beauty, and noise-dampening features (based on published STC/OITC and U-Factor ratings). Pella Lifestyle series’ wood windows reduce heat escape up to 79%, qualifying them as an Energy Star rated product. The materials are also designed to muffle outside noise, reducing noise up to 51%, keeping your home quiet as well as comfortable. The Lifestyle series is designed to be modular to accommodate a home’s evolving need for new features, like blinds, shades and window treatments.

  • Pella Impervia (fiberglass)

The Pella Impervia series of fiberglass windows are incredibly strong, durable, and energy-efficient. Impervia is made of five layers of Duracast material which can withstand extreme weather and temperatures. The fiberglass can be molded to resemble wood grain and can be painted to match any decor.

  • Pella 350 Series (vinyl)

The Pella 350 series offers triple pane windows which provide 54% to 83% more energy efficiency than single-pane windows. The 350 series uses InsulShield Advanced Low-E glass with argon, which is designed to reduce radiant heat and ultraviolet light entering the home via sunlight. This helps to control the fluctuations of heating and cooling inside the home.

The vinyl frames offer more insulation than a standard vinyl window, which increases performance. These vinyl frames also hide the welds and beveled edges for a more aesthetic look. The vinyl frames come in a variety of colors to match or accent a home’s interior. These windows are also sturdy and designed to withstand extreme weather, and include HurricaneShield impact-resistant glass.

  • Pella 250 Series

The Pella 250 series is their vinyl option for double or triple-paned windows. The sash and corner welds are designed to be less visible than typical vinyl windows, increasing their smooth aesthetic. The 250 series comes standard with Low-E InsulShield glass, which increases energy efficiency and filters ultraviolet rays. The vinyl allows for a wide spectrum of colors to match or enhance a home’s decor. These windows are made with a multi-pane design to reduce noise. These windows are built with Autolock that latches upon closing for convenience.

  • Pella Impervia (fiberglass)

Pella’s Impervia line is made from Pella’s five-layer composite Duracast fiberglass, which both helps to resist warping and provides insulation to withstand extreme weather. Impervia window frames are powder-coated and can be painted to match a home’s decor. The Impervia series meets Energy Star standards.

  • Pella Encompass

Pella’s Encompass series is an Energy Star-rated product designed for efficiency and durability. This line is made of pre-colored vinyl so the colors don’t fade or peel. These windows are also hardened to resist dings, scratches, and dents. This line includes multi-chambered frames that allow for high-efficiency insulation, strength, and performance.

Pella Replacement Windows Cost

The cost of replacing your windows with Pella products can vary based on product type and the scope of the project. The best way to understand Pella replacement window costs is to request a quote.

Pella Replacement Windows Longevity

Pella vinyl windows last about 15-30 years, depending on series and materials. Wood frames may require periodic painting.

Pella Replacement Windows Warranty

Pella windows have a non-transferable limited lifetime warranty, which you can read about on their website.

Pella Replacement Windows Reviews

Consumer Affairs gives Pella an overall satisfaction rating of 3.5 stars (out of five). This rating is based on 465 reviews submitted in the past year. Positive reviews praised Pella’s quick and detailed installation and customer service. Some reviewers who had problems with their Pella products said the company did a great job of identifying the issues and expediting replacements. But some negative reviews cited product deterioration and unexpected costs as causes for concern.

More About Replacement Window Installation

When deciding what replacement windows are best for your house, it’s important to first understand the important considerations surrounding replacement windows. When building a new home, windows can be customized to fit the home’s specific needs. But when a window needs to be replaced, installation can be trickier. Replacement windows must be able to fit in the existing window opening.

There are two methods of fitting a replacement window into the window opening: pocket installation and full-frame installation:

Pocket Installation

Pocket installation is when the replacement window fits easily into the existing frame. This method only requires that the window sash is replaced, demanding little labor and time.

Full-Frame Installation

Full-frame replacement is more involved. Full-frame requires that the entire frame is removed, including the trim and insulation. This method allows for more flexibility. Once the trim is removed, there are more options to replace the window. This method is more costly, however, due to increased labor and material costs.

But either method can add value to a home, increase efficiency, and improve aesthetics.