Original and Strikingly Clever: V-House by GAAGA

Original and Strikingly Clever: V-House by GAAGA

V-House was designed by a company of architects entitled GAAGA and is located in Leiden, The Netherlands. This beautiful compact home takes its name from a distinct feature: its roof shape. Even though it is hardly noticeable from the outside, the crib has a total of two floors, each with its well structured living zones. The first level accommodates the entrance hall, with views to the garden, the stairway and a corridor which opens up to the bedrooms on the right side and to a large polyvalent space on the left side. On the top floor, there is a living, dining and kitchen area. These spaces are all united under a single ceiling, varying in height from 2.8 meters at the centre to 4.1 meters at the edges. We really love the diversity of this house, which inspires warmth and serenity. Have a look at the photos and tell us if you feel the same. [ Photography: Marcel van der Burg ]

5 comments

  • Tom June 7, 2011 at 14:40 PMLogin to Reply →

    What about the rainwater and snow? A lot of Dutch houses have trapezoid roofs because of this… How do they assure they won’t get leaks? Any ideas/remarks?

  • Basia June 7, 2011 at 16:54 PMLogin to Reply →

    I suppose that roof is not only V-shaped, but it also goes down I mean there is a little angle relative to the ground, so that water or snow can easlily trickle down.

  • great interior design June 7, 2011 at 17:10 PMLogin to Reply →

    the name is funny clever house….
    lol

  • mitate June 7, 2011 at 19:40 PMLogin to Reply →

    funny clever, eh?
    tom made a valid point, because in doing away with even a flat roof, never mind a pitched one, not only has a mass of storage space been lost, it has also created a quite unnecessary potential water ingress problem.
    but all that apart, who wants their ceiling looking as if the builders used defective lally columns…..

  • drdamour June 7, 2011 at 21:28 PMLogin to Reply →

    i too would worry about the roof & rain, roofs are pitched the other way on purpose.

    Is it shingled? if so how do the shingles at the trough meet? Do they hang over a gutter down the middle? something about this doesn’t make sense.